Low Vision

There are many ways to adapt work, but how about so called inaccessible work–all that is possible. Here are a few ways to do just that.

Adapting work using Jaws OCR-how to tell if work is image or text in PDF

The fastest way to adapt inaccessible PDF with graphics when you run out of time

How to adapt work for low vision–continue on with skills

Adapt work for Low Vision using shapes for Math or Chemistry

How to adapt work for blind/low vision students

Access Technology for Low Vision-See your computer screen better

Tricks for students to adapt last minute work fast –right in class

There is a larger population of low vision people than blind. The low vision population is growing rapidly as people age and have diminished sight. If you wish to continue to use your computer with ease, eighteen low vision lessons to teach you how to download large cursors, enhance contrast on your machine, multiple ways to enlarge text in Word, enlarging text and graphics in the Internet and how to set up a low vision device for students in classrooms that need to see the board has been created for you. This group of lessons that will help you increase your ability to SEE everything on your computer. Go to the Low Vision TAB above, where both XP-Office 2003 and Windows 7-Office 2010 are available for immediate download.

 

Watch video on Youtube: Dr. Denise Robinson demonstrates Low Vision tricks on the computer and How to SEE your computer better
 

Android Apps Addressing Low Vision from AFB AccessWorld Magazine

Best Android Apps for People with Low Vision

The expanding accessibility options included in the Google Android operating system, plus a wide array of affordable mobile devices that run the Android OS, have made the platform an increasingly popular choice for those looking for a smartphone or tablet. Since Android is an open operating system, deployed by a number of manufacturers on their phones and tablets, buyers can choose from an array of hardware, without having to wonder whether the gadget they like best is accessible. In addition to the TalkBack screen reader, Android’s recent versions allow users with low vision to build their own accessible experiences using a combination of settings for changing the way the screen looks. A few vendors, including Samsung, have even added accessibility tools of their own to the stock Android environment.

But as accessible as your Android phone or tablet may be out of the box, there’s a whole world of apps available that you can use to customize the way your device screen looks, increase your productivity, and even deploy the built-in camera to get a closer look at the world around you. The vast Google Play store includes many apps you can buy or download for free, that you can use to customize your mobile device. In this article, we’ll take a look at some of the best apps for Android users with low vision. Keep in mind that there are many more accessible apps that work well with the TalkBack screen reader, and also provide great productivity for both those with visual impairments. Our focus here is on apps that support a low-vision Android user experience, and also make it possible to use a phone or tablet as a visual assistant. For more apps that are accessible to blind and low-vision users, check out the community website, Inclusive Android, where members rate and review a wide range of Android hardware and software.—read full article here

Color Blind Home Page

Here are the tests you need to see if you have color blind issues.

This web-site defines being colorblind and will educate you about the different types of colorblindness. It explains why you may be colorblind and what teachers, school nurses, and parents should know about being colorblind. You will learn about a new “pediatric” color vision test for early detection. If you think you may be colorblind, you can test your color vision on-line here for free.

Click here to start the test and see the Demonstration Card

 

Chrome book Accessibility features

Not  recommended for blind students–still too many barriers to total accessibility and speed with Chromevox

http://www.chromestory.com/2013/02/accessibility-options-on-chromebooks/

  1. Accessibility features built into Chrome OS on Chromebooks:
    1. Screen Magnification
    2. High Contrast
    3. Spoken feedback/ChromeVox

 

  1. ChromeVox for Google Chrome – text to speech
  2. Voice Note for Google Chrome – speech to text
  3. Ipad OS 9 features

 

**** to turn off ChromoVox in Google Chrome – go to paper looking icon – click tools – click extensions – and disable  *****

 

How to Enable Accessibility Options In Chrome OS

To enable accessibility options in Chrome OS, go to settings and search accessibility. You can also access them by going to Settings > Advanced Options > Accessibility

Chromevox Suit of Accessibility Options for Chrome

ChromeVox is a screen reader for Chrome which brings the speed, versatility, and security of Chrome to visually impaired users. Here is a video explaining the features of this extension. http://youtu.be/gZJtLIHZb2s

How Spoken Feedback Works

From the Chrome OS help website:

  • On the sign-in screen, the user name field and password prompts are spoken. Your password is not echoed when you enter it for security reasons.
  • Once you’re signed in, the Chrome OS screenreader, ChromeVox, is activated. With ChromeVox active, you get spoken feedback for all user actions (e.g. browsing menus, opening webpages).
  • ChromeVox provides a set of keyboard commands you can use to navigate Chrome menus and webpages. You can navigate web content in a variety of ways. For example, pressing the arrow keys while holding down the Shift and Search keys moves through the elements on the current page and speaks them intelligently as they are traversed. If you’re using an external keyboard (on a Chromebook or Chromebox), the shortcut keys are Shift and Windows key

 

ChromeVox User Guide

http://www.chromevox.com/index.html

ChromeVox is a screen reader for Chrome which brings the speed, versatility, and security of Chrome to visually impaired users. The following are a few resources to help you start using ChromeVox or to help you learn new features if you’re an experienced ChromeVox user.

Activating ChromeVox

ChromeVox is available as an extension for Google Chrome on Windows and Mac OS and comes built into Chrome OS to provide out of box accessibility. The information below should help you setup ChromeVox in your environment.

·Installing ChromeVox in Google Chrome on Windows and Mac OS

ChromeVox is an extension for Google Chrome and is available for one-click install via the Chrome Web store.

·Enabling ChromeVox on Chrome OS

Learn how to get up and running with ChromeVox on Chrome OS devices.

Using ChromeVox

·ChromeVox Interactive Tutorial

This tutorial is intended to be used with ChromeVox running. It’s an interactive walkthrough that introduces ChromeVox features one at a time, and enables you to try them out as you read the tutorial.

·Navigating with ChromeVox

A quick-start guide to navigating with ChromeVox.

·ChromeVox Keyboard Shortcuts

This page lists all of the ChromeVox keyboard shortcuts for your reference. ChromeVox also includes an interactive command lookup feature.

·Release Notes

Details about changes in the 1.31 ChromeVox release available on the Chrome Web Store.

ChromeVox Keyboard Shortcuts Reference

This reference a complete list of all the keyboard commands associated with ChromeVox. These commands can be referenced at any time through the command help menu. Press ChromeVox + Period and use the up and down arrow keys to navigate or begin typing the command you are looking for.

If you are using ChromeVox on Chrome OS, the ChromeVox Keys are Search + Shift. On Mac OS X, the ChromeVox keys are Control + Command and on Windows and other platforms, the ChromeVox keys are Control + Alt.

Sticky Mode

  • On Chrome OS, double-tap the Search key to enable/disable sticky mode.
  • On Mac OS, double-tap the left Command key to enable/disable sticky mode.
  • On Windows, double-tap the Insert key to enable/disable sticky mode.

Prefix Key

The Prefix Key is activated by pressing Control + Z. If the prefix is activated, the next key press will behave as if the ChromeVox keys are enabled. After that, the ChromeVox keys will go back to being off unless the Prefix Key is pressed again.

Speech Commands

  • Control = Stop speaking the current text
  • ChromeVox + Single quote = Increase pitch of speech
  • ChromeVox + Semicolon = Decrease pitch of speech
  • ChromeVox + Close Bracket = Increase rate of speech
  • ChromeVox + Open Bracket = Decrease rate of speech

Basic Navigation

  • ChromeVox + Down = Navigate Forward
  • ChromeVox + Up = Navigate backward
  • ChromeVox + Right = Navigate forward at a more detailed level
  • ChromeVox + Left = Navigate backward at a more detailed level
  • ChromeVox + Equals = Change navigation level to more detail
  • ChromeVox + Minus = Change navigation level to less detail
  • Enter = Activate current item
  • ChromeVox + Space = Force click on current item
  • ChromeVox + R = Start reading from current location

Jump Commands

ChromeVox allows you navigate through lists of similar items, such as links, headers etc. To move to a specific item on a page, press ChromeVox + either N or P. N stands for Next and P stands for Previous.

Headings

To move to the next header on the page, press ChromeVox + N then H. To move to the previous header on the page, press ChromeVox + P then H.

You can also move to a specific heading level by pressing ChromeVox + N or P then the number representing that heading level. For example, to move to the next level 2 header, press ChromeVox + N then 2.

Other items

  • Tab = Jump to next focusable item
  • Shift + Tab = Jump to previous focusable item
  • Press ChromeVox + N or ChromeVox + P and then one of the following commands:
    • A = Anchor
    • Q = Block quote
    • B = Button
    • X = Checkbox
    • C = Combobox
    • G = Graphic
    • H = Heading
    • J = Jump
    • ; = Landmark
    • F = Form Field
    • L = Link
    • O = List
    • I = List item
    • R = Radio button
    • S = Slider
    • T = Table

Table Mode

Table Mode is activated by ChromeVox + Back slash when reading a table. The following are the commands that become available only in table mode.

  • ChromeVox + Back space = Force exit table mode
  • ChromeVox + Down = Go to next table row
  • ChromeVox + Up = Go to previous table row
  • ChromeVox + Right = Go to next table column
  • ChromeVox + Left = Go to previous table column
  • ChromeVox + T then H = Announce headers of the current cell
  • ChromeVox + T then L = Announce coordinates of the current cell
  • ChromeVox + T then Open bracket = Go to beginning of table
  • ChromeVox + T then Close bracket = Go to end of table
  • ChromeVox + T then Semicolon = Go to beginning of the current row
  • ChromeVox + T then Single quote = Go to end of the current row
  • ChromeVox + T then Comma = Go to beginning of the current column
  • ChromeVox + T then Period = Go to end of the current column

Use the command help menu ChromeVox + Period to explore additional table commands.

Getting Help

  • ChromeVox + O then T = Open ChromeVox Tutorial
  • ChromeVox + Period = Show ChromeVox command help
  • Escape = Hide ChromeVox command help
  • ChromeVox + O then O = Open options page
  • ChromeVox + Forward Slash = Enable search within the page.

Browser commands

Address bar

  • Control L = Move to the address bar. From here you can type your search term in the address bar and press Enter to see results. In addition to search terms, you can type in the web address of a site, and press Enter to go to the site.

Working with tabs

  • Control + T = Open a new Tab
  • Control + W = Close a Tab
  • Control + Tab = Move through Tabs

Keyboard explorer

  • ChromeVox + O + K = Open keyboard explorer

Chrome OS Keyboard

Deactivate ChromeVox

  • ChromeVox can be activated / deactivated at any time by pressing ChromeVox + A + A

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Accessibility Features on a Chromebook

posted Oct 17, 2012, 8:07 AM by Molly Schroeder

By mistake, one of my teachers found out about the Chromebook Accessibility features.  Here is the information on how to Enable Spoken Feedback.  Thanks to Scott Johnson for this information!

Enable spoken feedback

If you’re on the main sign-in screen, press Ctrl+Alt+Z to enable or disable spoken feedback. You can also adjust this option on the Settings page.

  1. If you haven’t already, sign in to your Chrome device.
  2. Click the status area in the lower-right corner, where your account picture appears.
  3. Select Settings.
  4. Click Show advanced settings at the bottom of the page.
  5. In the “Accessibility” section, select the “Enable spoken feedback” checkbox.

How spoken feedback works

  • On the sign-in screen, the user name field and password prompts are spoken. Your password is not echoed when you enter it for security reasons.
  • Once you’re signed in, the Chrome OS screenreader, ChromeVox, is activated. With ChromeVox active, you get spoken feedback for all user actions (e.g. browsing menus, opening webpages).
  • ChromeVox provides a set of keyboard commands you can use to navigate Chrome menus and webpages. You can navigate web content in a variety of ways. For example, pressing the arrow keys while holding down the Shift and Search keys moves through the elements on the current page and speaks them intelligently as they are traversed. If you’re using an external keyboard (on a Chromebook or Chromebox), the shortcut keys are Shift and Windows key.

 

 

BigBrowser is an Internet browsing application designed to help Low Vision users more easily navigate the web on their iPads. It’s extra large keyboard and controls, expanded pinch zooming, and multiple color themes make content easy to read.

BigBrowser utilizes custom features that were created specifically for those who require increased magnification to read. It was designed to enhance your browsing experience, however, there are limitations. In this initial iteration of BigBrowser, the custom keyboard does not interface with text fields within web pages due to some constraints within iOS. Also, certain web pages (YouTube and Twitter being the most prominent) don’t allow for pinch zooming when viewed on an iPad. Both of these limitations are out of our hands but we will keep working to find a solution that can be included in future updates. The Apple ratings system requires that this app be rated 17+ solely because it does not restrict the user’s ability to locate and view certain materials on the web.

Find out more at: BigBrowser: iPad App

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