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braille display Tag

Reading a computer screen in Braille is a cumbersome process today. The visually impaired people who rely on the system of raised dots only have access to one line at a time. Beyond that, current systems don’t translate charts or graphs. A team of researchers from Michigan Engineering and the School of Music, Theater and Dance are working on a solution. Their technology, which has been described as a leader in the field, relies on pneumatic use of liquid or air to shrink the mechanism and expand it so it can display more at once. Their goal is for it to display the equivalent of a page of Kindle text at once. Go to: http://www.engin.umich.edu/college/about/news/stories/2015/december/refreshable-braille-device

Contact: Angela Fichera

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Updated! The Unofficial Guide to Changing Braille Displays and other Adaptive Technology into UEB

Introduction:

As the time has come to begin transitioning to Unified English Braille (UEB) in the US, I thought it would be a good idea to briefly discuss how to change various adaptive technologies to UEB from US English braille. Many pieces of assistive technology already support the UEB code, it s simply a matter of enabling them. Below is a list of the more common devices and how to make these changes. note that stand alone braille displays such as the Focus, Smart Beetle, Brailliant BI, etc, do not have specific settings for UEB, as these devices only receive input/output from the device they are connected to. Also note that these instructions apply to the latest version of the hardware/software listed, your results may vary on older models or versions of software. It is also assumed you know how to navigate and select various options for the hardware/software listed. A comprehensive guide to each device is beyond the scope of an article. Please consult user documentation for further support as needed.

Go to Braille Display to UEB

South Korean firm develops graphic tactile display for people with vision disabilities

Tactisplay Corp. located in South Korea has developed a prototype of graphic tactile display for people who are blind. This device has individually actuated 3,072 cells configured in 64 column with 48 rows. With this configuration, it can show graphic information in raised tactile dots.

graphic tactile displayThere is an internal image processing engine which summarizes the image and extracts crutial graphic information for the display. When this device is connected to USB camera, image captured by the USB camera is displayed in the tactile pin array after image processing. When this device is connected to PC or notebook using ethernet cable, monitor screen image is automatically transferred to the device for people who are blind to touch and feel what PC monitor is showing.

In this way, this device can be used as a mechanical eye for people with vision disabilities. There is no dangerous surgical operation required. User just need to carry the bag containing the device slung over the shoulder and clip USB camera to his/her eyeglasses to see the view.

This device, named TACTISPLAY Walk, is designed to be portable and be used outdoor. It has large battery inside which enables the device to operate 10 hours continuously. Its frontal area is little bit smaller than A4 paper and its thickess is 53mm (about two inches). Its weight is 2.5kg.

Pricing is not confirmed but they said that price will be under $7,000. It normally requires at least $20,000 for similar device.

They are planning to deliver commercial version of the device in two month. If you order today, you will be the owner of TACTISPLAY Walk in two months.

 

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