The Bureau of Engraving and Printing has announced persons legally residing in the U.S. who are blind or visually impaired can now request a free currency reader from the Bureau of Engraving and Printing (BEP) by downloading the required application from the BEP’s website (www.bep.gov). The application must be filled out completely, signed by a competent authority that can certify eligibility, and returned to the mailing address provided on the form. Estimated delivery time is 6-8 weeks. The currency reader device, called iBill Currency Identifier, provides a convenient means for blind or visually impaired individuals to identify all U.S. bills. The U.S. Currency Reader Program is a component of the BEP’s initiative to provide meaningful access to Federal Reserve notes. For more information call toll-free 844-815-9388 or email at meaningful.access@bep.gov.

Go to: U.S. Bureau of Engraving and Printing – Home

In 9th grade, this student was only using a brailler to braille out all work….a very slow process to get it transcribed, then to the teacher, then back to the student. In 2 months the student has moved to completing all work on a computer, emailing to teacher, teacher corrects and sends back.

Virtual lesson-teaching blind student how to use track changes in Word-how teachers correct

In case any of you have Russian-speaking friends interested in this
subject: Dr. Denise Robinson of TechVision has been interviewed on Radio
VOS, the Internet radio station of the All-Russia Association of the
Blind. On the show, Dr. Robinson discusses the importance and the
techniques of introducing young kids to computers and other IT devices.
Of course, the interview has been dubbed into Russian; but you can still
hear the English in the background.

Here is the direct link to this episode:

http://www.radiovos.ru/getafile.php?id=1412233813852987

Sincerely,
Oleg Shevkun
Editorial director
Radio VOS
Http://www.radiovos.ru

If you are blind or cannot read or need help remembering when to take your medications, here are a few options to help

1. The ScripTalk by Envision America-(click on link to open) is free to any person who signs up to use a participating pharmacy. It is a loan, so if you change pharmacies you need to return the device. Participating pharmacies include CVS mail order, some individual pharmacies, and some Wal Mart Pharmacies. You can see the participating pharmacies on the Envision Website or if you go to your local Wal Mart and request they get one, they have been very receptive according to Envision America.

2. Walgreens offers talking prescription labels, they use a different system. The recordable label also has an alarm to remind patients of the time to take their medications. Even if you do not use Walgreens pharmacy they are selling the recording devices with alarms for $10 each.
http://news.walgreens.com/article_display.cfm?article_id=5869

 

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