In 9th grade, this student was only using a brailler to braille out all work….a very slow process to get it transcribed, then to the teacher, then back to the student. In 2 months the student has moved to completing all work on a computer, emailing to teacher, teacher corrects and sends back.

Virtual lesson-teaching blind student how to use track changes in Word-how teachers correct

In case any of you have Russian-speaking friends interested in this
subject: Dr. Denise Robinson of TechVision has been interviewed on Radio
VOS, the Internet radio station of the All-Russia Association of the
Blind. On the show, Dr. Robinson discusses the importance and the
techniques of introducing young kids to computers and other IT devices.
Of course, the interview has been dubbed into Russian; but you can still
hear the English in the background.

Here is the direct link to this episode:

http://www.radiovos.ru/getafile.php?id=1412233813852987

Sincerely,
Oleg Shevkun
Editorial director
Radio VOS
Http://www.radiovos.ru

If you are blind or cannot read or need help remembering when to take your medications, here are a few options to help

1. The ScripTalk by Envision America-(click on link to open) is free to any person who signs up to use a participating pharmacy. It is a loan, so if you change pharmacies you need to return the device. Participating pharmacies include CVS mail order, some individual pharmacies, and some Wal Mart Pharmacies. You can see the participating pharmacies on the Envision Website or if you go to your local Wal Mart and request they get one, they have been very receptive according to Envision America.

2. Walgreens offers talking prescription labels, they use a different system. The recordable label also has an alarm to remind patients of the time to take their medications. Even if you do not use Walgreens pharmacy they are selling the recording devices with alarms for $10 each.
http://news.walgreens.com/article_display.cfm?article_id=5869

 

Everything you need to know about setting up and using Siri on your iPhone, iPod touch, and iPad!

Siri is the name of Apple's personal digital assistant. It's basically voice control that talks back to you, that understands relationships and context, and with a personality straight out of Pixar. Ask Siri questions, or ask Siri to do things for you, just like you would ask a real assistant, and Siri will help keep you connected, informed, in the right place, and on time. You can even use Siri's built in dictation feature to enter text almost everywhere by simply using your voice.

Now get going with more ease……click on heading link

Introducing UEB Online

UEB Online is a training program for sighted people to learn Unified English Braille (UEB). Unified English Braille has been adopted by many countries and replaces standard english braille. This program is the first online UEB training tool. The program is suitable for classroom and specialist teachers, parents, teacher aides and other professionals supporting children and adults with vision impairment.

This program has been created by the Royal Institute for Deaf and Blind Children’s Renwick Centre. We acknowledge the support and permission from the Round Table on Information Access for People with Print Disabilities and Australian Braille Authority for the adaptation of content from the Unified English Braille: Australian Training Manual, 2013 (edited by Howse, J., Riessen, K., & Holloway, L.).

I am presently taking this online class. I like to get the jump on knowledge so I can teach my students along the way to keep updated with braille in general. This class is excellent, self paced…on either a Mac or PC…learning the new Braille code. I highly recommend this great and easy way to learn. When you finish, get the certification you need….and it is free!

The announcement below is from the Bureau of Engravings and Printing (BEP) regarding the availability of currency readers. Here is a link to the webpage with the article that has been pasted in below: http://www.bep.gov/uscurrencyreaderpgm.html

Bureau of Engraving and Printing
U.S. Department of the Treasury
 
As an interim measure in advance of issuing tactile-enhanced Federal Reserve notes, the BEP is providing currency readers, free of charge, to eligible blind and visually impaired individuals.
 
The BEP recently announced its distribution plans for the U.S. Currency Reader Program.  Details of the announcement can be found in a press release issued on Thursday, July 3, 2014, and another released on Monday, July 14, 2014.
 
The U.S. Currency Reader Program will launch in two phases:
 
Pilot:  Beginning September 2, 2014, in partnership with the National Library Service for the Blind and Physically Handicapped, Library of Congress, (NLS) the BEP will initiate a four-month pilot where NLS patrons can pre-order a currency reader.  The pilot program allows the government to test its ordering and distribution processes and gauge demand for currency readers.   To receive a currency reader, eligible individuals who are currently patrons of NLS need only call 1-888-NLS-READ; the account will be noted and a currency reader will be delivered to the address on file.
 
National Rollout: Currency readers will be widely available to all U.S. citizens, or persons legally residing in the U.S. who are blind or visually impaired, starting January 2, 2015.  Individuals who are not NLS patrons must submit an application, signed by a competent authority who can certify eligibility. Applications will be available on this website and processed for non-patrons of NLS beginning January 2, 2015.
 
Additional information about the U.S. Currency Reader Program and about the currency reader device can be found in the links below.  The BEP encourages organizations that support the blind and visually impaired community to distribute these materials, or to incorporate the information provided into individualized communications.
 
Contact Us:  For additional questions or comments about the U.S. Currency Reader Program you may call (844) 815-9388 toll-free or email meaningful.access@bep.gov.
 
 
More about NLS:  NLS administers a free library program of braille and audio materials available to U.S. residents and citizens living abroad whose low vision, blindness, or physical handicap makes it difficult to read a standard printed page.  More information about the program and other services provided by NLS can be viewed at http://www.loc.gov/nls/.

The National Center for Accessible Media (NCAM)’sEffective Practices for Description of Science Content within DigitalTalking books at: http://ncam.wgbh.org/experience_learn/educational_media/stemdx

The “Accessible image sample book” (DIAGRAM PROJECT) at:
http://diagramcenter.org/standards-and-practices/accessible-image-sample-book.html

Tthe UKAAF (UK Association for Accessible Formats ) Guidance at:
http://www.ukaaf.org/formats-and-guidance#accessible   and
http://kn.open.ac.uk/public/workspace.cfm?wpid=3560

Other examples of equivalent text descriptions (Accessed) at:
http://access-ed.r2d2.uwm.edu/EqTDs/

The Audio Description Project
An Initiative of the American Council of the Blind

The following table is an alphabetical listing of movie titles which have been released commercially on DVDs and/or Blu-ray discs with audio description tracks, followed by the year in which they were released (on disc, not necessarily the year the movie itself was released).  The word "The" has been left in place alphabetically; so if you can't find your video, you may wish to look under "T."

For complete list, Go to the Audio Description Project

When you click on the wanted item, it will auto load you to Amazon to pay for it and then download

Font Resize
Contrast